“Combination of Worries” Gets Attention in Davos


By iMFdirect

Europe’s sovereign debt crisis, fiscal challenges in advanced economies, concerns about overheating in emerging market countries, and the impact of rising food prices. These are the hot topics at this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and a clear sign of the tensions and risks as the global economy recovers.

In a video interview from Davos, IMF First Deputy Managing Director John Lipsky tells us that, with the return of global growth, the mood is certainly more optimistic than it was a year or two ago. But there is also a clear sense among delegates that this has not solved some of the world’s important economic problems. Continue reading

Time Waits for No Man: How to Secure Financial Stability in 2011


By José Viñals

(Version in Español | 中文 | Français | 日本語 | Русский | عربي )

This morning, I presented our latest views on global financial stability in Johannesburg, South Africa.

So, where does the global financial system stand at the moment? Yes, we have witnessed improvements recently, but we are also observing a dichotomy between the economy and the financial system. While the global economic recovery has been continuing, financial stability is still at risk, because of a persistent lack of investor confidence in some advanced country sovereigns and their banking systems.

At this cross-roads, we see three key messages. Continue reading

Two-speed Global Recovery Continues


By Olivier Blanchard

(Version in Español | Français | Русский | عربي| 中文 | 日本語 )

The world economic recovery continues. But it remains a two-speed recovery: slow in advanced countries, and much faster in emerging and developing economies. As a result, tensions and risks are emerging, which require strong policy responses.

The outlook

For some time, global activity was led by fiscal stimulus and the restocking of inventories. This process is now essentially over, which means that global growth is set to slow over the coming year. Fortunately, underlying private demand is improving, so we expect the slowdown to be modest, with global growth remaining at 4.4 percent in 2011, down from 5 percent in 2010. Continue reading

Today’s Information is Ammunition for Tomorrow


By Luis M. Cubeddu and Camilo E. Tovar

(Version in Español)

Many Latin American economies are booming due to strong inflows of capital and stronger export earnings from high commodity prices. Though favorable today, this situation is also a double-edged sword.

Households, companies, and banks are spurred to take on financial risk. But, if risks become excessive or poorly managed, they sow the seeds of future problems. The region has experienced firsthand the boom and bust cycles that can ensue, and there is consensus that this needs to be avoided or minimized in the future. The IMF’s two latest Regional Economic Outlooks for the region—published in May and October 2010—focused on precisely this issue.

While the bottom line is the need for effective macroeconomic policy management and implementation, information is an essential ingredient. Continue reading

Toughing It Out: How the Baltics Defied Predictions


By Christoph Rosenberg

Two years ago, the eyes of the financial world were not on Europe’s Western periphery but on its North-Eastern corner. The three Baltic states—Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania—were among the first victims of the global financial crisis.

After a spectacular boom, with several years of Chinese-style growth rates, these small and open economies faced an equally spectacular bust. Credit―and with it property prices, consumption, and investment―collapsed. Exports were hit by the global depression. And the financial sector came under severe stress. Indeed, Latvia was forced to nationalize its largest domestic bank and had to ask for a bailout from the European Union and the IMF.

The conventional wisdom at the time was that these three countries would have to give up their long-standing currency pegs against the euro and devalue. After all, this is what countries facing a trade and financial shock most often choose to do.

Continue reading

2011—A Pivotal Year for Global Cooperation


By John Lipsky

(Version in Español | 中文 | Français | 日本語 | Русский | عربي )

2011 represents a pivotal year for the global economic recovery and for international policy cooperation—as well as for the role of the Fund in addressing these two principal challenges.

With the crisis of 2008-09 receding, and following the unprecedented efforts expended in 2010 developing the outlines of a new, post-crisis world, 2011 will be the year in which post-crisis plans will be implemented, tested, and assessed. If they are deemed to be successful, it will not be an exaggeration to claim that a new model for global economic and financial governance will be under way. If unsuccessful, however, the sense of failure likely would undermine confidence while adding to the formidable list of challenges to be overcome. Continue reading

iMFdirect–Must Reads on Global Finance and Budgets


While 2011 is still shiny as a new penny we thought you might like a quick review of 2010’s hot topics in the global economy.  The iMF Direct Blog has picked our list of must read posts covering the highs and lows of global finance and government budgets and spending.

  1. The Ten Commandments for advanced economies to keep the economic recovery on track 
  2. The financial world remains the Achilles Heel of the global economic recovery 
  3. We explain the right mix of ingredients for countries to provide sufficient support to economic activity, and reassure markets in How to Bake a Fiscal Pie 
  4. Fixing the financial sector – Just Do It  
  5. Stable prices and financial stability go hand in hand, or do they? A Marriage Made in Heaven or Hell   
  6. What Must Be Done – the top five reforms to the financial system 
  7. When it comes to supervising the financial rules of the global economy, It’s Hip to Be Square 
  8. Watch This Fiscal Space  to figure out how much room to maneuver governments have when it comes to controlling debt and deficits 
  9. Financial markets and regulators need to break their Credit Rating Addiction
  10.  The global financial tornado means We’re Not in Kansas Anymore, but what will the future financial system look like?
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