The Case for a Managed Float under Inflation Targeting


By Jonathan D. Ostry

(Version in Español)

The global financial crisis has reminded emerging market economies, if they needed reminding, that capital flows can be highly volatile and that crises need not be home grown.

Emerging markets have been affected in a variety of ways, not least by the sharp ups and downs in exchange rates that volatile capital flows engender.

These ups and downs may be less benign in emerging markets than they might be in advanced economies for a number of reasons.

  • First, emerging markets may have more fragile balance sheets—essentially they are less well hedged against currency risk—so depreciations may engender financial distress and even bankruptcies and adverse effects on economic activity.
  • Second, they may be less flexible, so that when the exchange rate strengthens and the traded goods sector loses competitiveness, this may have permanent effects on the economy even if the exchange rate later reverts to its initial level.

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Africa’s Growth Puzzle: Better Ways to Fill Infrastructure Gaps


The issue of reviving or maintaining economic growth is a the forefront of policymakers’ minds all around the world. Of course, the policies needed to achieve that differ from region-to-region, country-to-country.

For many countries in Africa, weak infrastructure is an obstacle to raising growth.

In a recent interview with IMF Survey online magazine, Andrew Berg of the IMF’s Research Department (and one of our contributing bloggers) discusses the challenge of overcoming what he calls a “tremendous infrastructure deficit”, an issue that “affects all levels of society and all aspects. It affects health, education and growth.”

The issue is complicated further by the many competing demands these countries face. “We are talking about the need for infrastructure development, but we could be talking about how incredibly important it is to spend on AIDS, health, education, or any number of things,” says Berg.

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Lagarde: “World Economy Not Out of Danger Zone”


Although a derailing of the global recovery has been avoided, the world economy is still not out of the danger zone, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said after the conclusion of the Group of 20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meeting in Mexico City.

“Over the last two days, we discussed the challenges facing the world economy and continued our deliberations over next steps and actions,” she said in a February 26 press statement.

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IMF Welcomes New Eurozone Understanding on Greece


The IMF has welcomed the agreement by Eurozone finance minister on a new support package for Greece.

After talks that went on until the early hours of the morning in Brussels, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said on February 21 she welcomed the “proposed understandings reached today by the Euro Group to support Greece.”

“The combination of ambitious and broad policy efforts by Greece , and substantial and long-term financial contributions by the official and private sectors, will create the space needed to secure improvements in debt sustainability and competitiveness,” she said in a statement. “These actions, together with a significant strengthening of the financial sector, will pave the way for a gradual resumption of economic growth.”

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Get the Basics in Economics from the IMF’s One-Stop Shop


The IMF’s Finance & Development magazine has just come out with a useful web compilation of stories in its “Back to Basics” series on economics.

The page is aimed at students, academics, and those seeking a broader understanding of economic ideas. It pulls together articles from the Back to Basics column in the quarterly magazine that have been published since 2003.

Editors at the magazine, which is published in Arabic, Chinese, French, Spanish, and Russian, as well as English  have revisited the series, updating and revising where needed, and helpfully compiling the most relevant B2B stories in one place. The series is ongoing and they say they will add new articles as they appear in the magazine.

F&D publishes analysis of topics related to the global crisis, international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other world economic issues.

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The Impact of the Gloomier Global Outlook on Latin America


By Nicolás Eyzaguirre

(Version in Español)

The IMF has sharply marked down its forecast for world growth and it now expects a mild recession in the euro area. Naturally, weaker world growth will affect economic activity in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Concretely, the Fund expects the world economy to grow by just 3¼ percent in 2012, ¾ percentage points lower than our September forecasts.

In contrast, our forecast for the U.S. economy for 2012 is unchanged, as incoming data signal a stronger—but still sluggish—domestic recovery that will offset a weaker global environment. Commodity prices will be affected by ebbing global demand, with oil projected to fall about 5 percent and non-oil commodities about 14 percent.

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Saudi Arabia: a Key Regional and Global Player


By Christine Lagarde

(Version in عربي)

I have just returned from Saudi Arabia, where I was welcomed with exceptional warmth and hospitality. It was my first visit as the Managing Director of the IMF.

It was a pleasure to be in Saudi Arabia, a country with rich heritage and culture. And a country that is seeking to chart a path that balances the drive for greater economic development and closer integration into the global economy with the strong desire to preserve the traditions and values of its people.

I had the privilege of meeting H.M. King Abdullah, senior government officials, and representatives of the private sector. Our discussions were productive and constructive, and we traded views on current global, regional, and domestic developments. Continue reading

Hope and Perseverance on Tunisia’s Demanding Road Ahead


By Christine Lagarde

(Version in عربي)

Tunisia, the spark that ignited the Arab Spring, was where I spent the past two days. I held official meetings with the new leaders of the country. They spoke about the Freedom and Dignity Revolution, as the Tunisians call it, and of their concerns to ensure a smooth transition to democracy and prosperity.

One year on, it is still extraordinary to think how this dramatic transformation by a grassroots movement has migrated to other countries across the Middle East and North Africa.

Alongside my official visits, I particularly enjoyed a lunch I had with a small group of women, entrepreneurs, professors, and youth activists who spoke passionately about their lives, their commitment, and their hopes for their country. Continue reading

It’s the Years, Not The Mileage: IMF Analysis of Pension Reforms in Advanced Economies


By Benedict Clements

Indiana Jones, the fictional character of the namesake movies, once said “It’s not the years, it’s the mileage.” This quote comes to mind as many advanced economies wrestle with pension reform and the best way to ensure both retirees and governments don’t go broke.

Our view, explained in a new study, is that the years do matter.

Our analysis shows that gradually raising retirement ages could help countries contain increases in pension spending and boost economic growth. Further cuts in pension benefits, or raising payroll contributions, are also options countries could consider, although many countries will find many advantages in raising retirement ages.

The challenge is to reform pension systems without hurting their ability to provide income security for the elderly and prevent old-age poverty. Continue reading

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