Strengthening the Foundations for Fiscal Policymaking: A New Fiscal Transparency Code


Min ZhuBy Min Zhu

In the last two decades, countries have come a long way in shedding greater light on their public finances. The global economic crisis has reminded us, however, that we need to do more to ensure fiscal policymaking is based on reliable data on fiscal outcomes, credible forecasts of fiscal prospects, and a comprehensive assessment of fiscal risks. Working with civil society, governments, and others, the IMF has just presented a revised draft of its Fiscal Transparency Code, and we would like to know what you think of it so we can improve it further. You can comment here.

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Rethinking Macroeconomic Policy


blanchBy Olivier Blanchard

(Versions in عربي中文FrançaisРусский, and Español)

The IMF has just hosted a second conference devoted to rethinking macroeconomic policy in the wake of the crisis. After two days of fascinating presentations and discussions, I am certain of one thing:  this is unlikely to be our last conference on the subject.

Rethinking and reforms are both taking place.  But we still do not know the final destination, be it for the redefinition of monetary policy, or the contours of financial regulation, or the role of macroprudential tools. We have a general sense of direction, but we are largely navigating by sight.

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Building on Latin America’s Success


Christine Lagarde

By Christine Lagarde

(Version in Español)

Next week, I will travel to Latin America—my second visit to the region since November 2011. I return with increased optimism, as much of Latin America continues its impressive transformation that started a decade ago.

The region remains resilient to the recent bouts in global volatility, and many countries continue to expand at a healthy pace. An increasing number of people are escaping the perils of poverty to join a growing and increasingly vibrant middle class.

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The Solution Is More, Not Less Europe


By Antonio Borges

(Versions in عربي,  中文, 日本語EspañolFrançais)

It is hard to hold the course in the middle of a storm, but European policymakers need to if they want European integration to succeed. The sovereign debt crisis is a serious challenge, which requires a strong and coordinated effort by all involved to finally put it behind us.

Surviving the storm will be of little consequence if the euro area finds itself trapped in the perpetual winter of low growth. Germany may be expanding at record speed right now, but it wasn’t so long ago when it grew much more slowly—just 1.5 percent per year between 1995 and 2007. In contrast, Sweden grew by 3 percent a year and the United States by 2 percent during the same period.

Many experts fear that without reforms, growth in Germany could drop even lower in the next 5‑10 years and beyond when global trade cools again. The situation is worse in the countries that currently find themselves in the eye of the storm.

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No Time to Waste: IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde


by iMFdirect

The IMF’s managing director Christine Lagarde gave her first press conference today, in which she outlined three focal issues for the institution:

Our analysis of the connections between and among countries’ economies and financial sectors

The credibility of our analysis to countries must be candid and evenhanded

A comprehensive approach to our work that includes employment and social issues to help create stable economies.

Lagarde told the assembled reporters she had arrived in Washington soon after her selection because “there are many issues to address that cannot wait for a summer holiday.”

In an interview the day before, Lagarde said sovereign debt and capital flows were two of the main challenges facing the global economy.

Have a look: 

 

 

The MENA Jobs and Growth Challenge: How Can Finance Help?


By Masood Ahmed

Most policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa agree that stronger economic growth is a crucial component of any strategy to address the region’s persistently high levels of unemployment and raise its living standards. One question that arises is: What role can the financial sector play?

It is well known that a dynamic and vibrant financial sector will improve economic outcomes for a country, leading to faster and more equitable economic growth. The key to answering this question, therefore, is to look to the past and examine how the financial sector has contributed historically to growth in the region. Continue reading

Government Bonds: No Longer a World Without Risk


By José Viñals

The risk free nature of government bonds, one of the cornerstones of the global financial system, has come into question as the global crisis unfolds.

One thing is now very clear: government bonds are no longer the risk-free assets they once were. This carries far reaching implications for policymakers, central bankers, debt managers, and how the demand and supply sides of government bond markets function.

After a recent IMF conference on a new approach to government risk, I’d like to highlight three key aspects: Continue reading

No End in Sight: Early Lessons on Crisis Management


By Stijn Claessens and Ceyla Pazarbasioglu

(Version in Español)

Crises are like stories; they have a beginning, middle, and an end, and on occasion, we learn something along the way.

In times of crisis, choices must be made. In the most recent global economic crisis policymakers moved quickly to stabilize the system, providing massive financial support, which is the right response in the beginning of any crisis. But that only treated the symptoms of the global financial meltdown, and now a rare opportunity is being thrown away to tackle the underlying causes.

Without restructuring financial institutions’ balance sheets and their operations, as well as their assets ‒ loans to over-indebted households and enterprises ‒ the economic recovery will suffer, and the seeds will be sown for the next crisis. Continue reading

iMFdirect–Must Reads on Global Finance and Budgets


While 2011 is still shiny as a new penny we thought you might like a quick review of 2010’s hot topics in the global economy.  The iMF Direct Blog has picked our list of must read posts covering the highs and lows of global finance and government budgets and spending.

  1. The Ten Commandments for advanced economies to keep the economic recovery on track 
  2. The financial world remains the Achilles Heel of the global economic recovery 
  3. We explain the right mix of ingredients for countries to provide sufficient support to economic activity, and reassure markets in How to Bake a Fiscal Pie 
  4. Fixing the financial sector – Just Do It  
  5. Stable prices and financial stability go hand in hand, or do they? A Marriage Made in Heaven or Hell   
  6. What Must Be Done – the top five reforms to the financial system 
  7. When it comes to supervising the financial rules of the global economy, It’s Hip to Be Square 
  8. Watch This Fiscal Space  to figure out how much room to maneuver governments have when it comes to controlling debt and deficits 
  9. Financial markets and regulators need to break their Credit Rating Addiction
  10.  The global financial tornado means We’re Not in Kansas Anymore, but what will the future financial system look like?
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