Finish the Job on Financial Regulation


GFSRBy José Viñals

Brisbane and Basel may be 10,000 miles apart, but when it comes to financial regulation the two cities will be standing cheek by jowl.

At the next summit of the Group of Twenty advanced and emerging economies, to be held in Brisbane in November, political leaders will take the pulse of the global financial regulatory reform agenda, launched five years ago. The explicit goal of the Australian G-20 presidency is to finally complete these essential reforms. As Prime Minister Tony Abbott said today in Davos, “Financial regulation is always a work-in-progress, but these reforms now need to be finalized in ways that promote confidence without eliminating risk.”

I strongly support this extra push to create a safer financial system that can better support the needs of the real economy, and better protect taxpayers. For far too long, critics have been able to portray the G-20 reform agenda as a regulatory supertanker stuck in the shallow waters of technical complexity, financial industry pushback, and diverging national views. This image is increasingly off the mark.

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The Danger Zone: Financial Stability Risks Soar


By José Viñals

(Versions in عربيFrançais日本語, and Русский)

We are back in the danger zone. Since the IMF’s previous Global Financial Stability Report, financial stability risks have increased substantially—reversing some of the progress that had been made over the previous three years.

 Several shocks have recently buffeted the global financial system: unequivocal signs of a broader global economic slowdown; fresh market turbulence in the euro area; and the credit downgrade of the United States.

This has thrown us into a crisis of confidence driven by three main factors: weak growth, weak balance sheets, and weak politics. Continue reading

A Tale of Titans: The Too Important to Fail Conundrum


By Aditya Narain and İnci Ötker-Robe

Folklore is riddled with tales of a lone actor undoing a titan: David and Goliath; Heracles and Atlas; Jack and the Beanstalk, to name a few.

Financial institutions seen as too important to fail have become even larger and more complex since the global crisis. We need look no further than the example of investment bank Lehman Brothers to understand how one financial institution’s failure can threaten the global financial system and create devastating effects to economies around the world. Continue reading

Global Challenges, Global Solutions


By iMFdirect

The IMF-World Bank Spring Meetings are upon us here in Washington DC.

With global challenges that require global solutions—the theme of the meetings—IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn reminds us that this is “not the time for complacency.”

Government ministers and officials, members of civil society organizations, journalists, and others are flocking to Washington DC this week to discuss and decide on key issues facing the global economy. Continue reading

Macroprudential Policy—Filling the Black Hole


By José Viñals

When the global financial system was thrown into crisis, many policymakers were shocked to discover a gaping hole in their policy toolkit.

They have since made significant progress in developing macroprudential policy measures aimed at containing system-wide risks in the financial sector. Yet progress has been uneven. Greater efforts are needed to transform this policy patchwork into an effective crisis-prevention toolkit. 

Given the enormous economic and human cost of the recent financial debacle, I strongly believe that we cannot afford to miss this opportunity for substantial reform. Continue reading

iMFdirect–Must Reads on Global Finance and Budgets


While 2011 is still shiny as a new penny we thought you might like a quick review of 2010’s hot topics in the global economy.  The iMF Direct Blog has picked our list of must read posts covering the highs and lows of global finance and government budgets and spending.

  1. The Ten Commandments for advanced economies to keep the economic recovery on track 
  2. The financial world remains the Achilles Heel of the global economic recovery 
  3. We explain the right mix of ingredients for countries to provide sufficient support to economic activity, and reassure markets in How to Bake a Fiscal Pie 
  4. Fixing the financial sector – Just Do It  
  5. Stable prices and financial stability go hand in hand, or do they? A Marriage Made in Heaven or Hell   
  6. What Must Be Done – the top five reforms to the financial system 
  7. When it comes to supervising the financial rules of the global economy, It’s Hip to Be Square 
  8. Watch This Fiscal Space  to figure out how much room to maneuver governments have when it comes to controlling debt and deficits 
  9. Financial markets and regulators need to break their Credit Rating Addiction
  10.  The global financial tornado means We’re Not in Kansas Anymore, but what will the future financial system look like?

Toto, we’re not in Kansas anymore: Exploring the Contours of the Financial System After the Tornado


By Laura Kodres

Just as a tornado in Kansas transplanted Dorothy and, her dog, Toto, from familiar comforts to the unknown land of Oz, the global crisis has led many to wonder what has become of the global financial system and, more importantly, what will it look like next. Is the wicked witch of the West—excessive risk taking and leverage—really dead?

But now, as the storm subsides, there is time to speculate about what the future financial sector might look like. My IMF colleague, Aditya Narain, and I have done just that in a new Staff Position Note that attempts to discern the contours of this new financial landscape. What is clear is that the new landscape will be influenced by both the private and public sectors—their reactions to the crisis and to each other.

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