Tharman Sees “Greater Global Policy Resolve”


“Although the economic environment has weakened, the policy resolve has strengthened.” This is how Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Singapore’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Finance , who is Chair of the IMF’s policy-setting committee, described the outcome of the IMF-World Bank annual meetings in Tokyo.

Growth is slower than anyone expected,” he admitted in a video interview.  “It is slower in Europe, it is not as fast as it should be in the United States, not as fast as it should be to bring unemployment down, and it is slowing in Asia to a greater extent than was expected. Tharman is chair of the 24-member IMFC.

“But we are now in a much better situation than six months ago when it comes to policy solutions.” He said there had been major steps forward in Europe “despite some disagreement on individual pieces.”  But underlying problems in the Eurozone, budget problems in the United States, and structural problems in global economy are longer term problems and “cannot be fixed quickly.”

For a quick brief on the outcomes from the meetings in Tokyo, take a look at:

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Year in Review: Lessons from History–No Way Back to Cheap, Easy Credit


By James Boughton

The world economy is beginning to awaken from a nightmare. What hit us, and what was the tossing and turning all about? The popular simile is a comparison with the Great Depression, as in “This is the worst downturn since the 1930s.”

In fact, unless we get hit with another hammer before we fully wake up, the Great Recession is very unlike what the world went through some seven decades earlier.

The Great Depression, like the recent collapse, began with a banking crisis, but of a different kind. Instead of emanating from huge financial institutions in major money markets, the earlier one spread outward from small midwestern banks in the United States and led eventually to a near total loss of confidence.

Depositors pulled their money out into cash or gold, and the U.S. banking system shut down. Investors in other countries also moved heavily into “safe” assets.

Cars in line at U.S. gas station in 1979: the world in which consumption could flourish amid cheap and readily available energy was gone forever (photo: R. Krubner/ClassicStock/Corbis)

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Asia and the IMF: Toward a Deeper Engagement


Update: IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn delivered speeches in both Singapore and Beijing. In Singapore he spoke of a leadership role for Asia, while in Beijing he addressed how China is leading the world out of recession and the need for further reform of China’s dynamic economy.

By Anoop Singh

(Version in 日本語)

Asia’s standing and influence continues to grow and the IMF is working with the region to help it meet its full economic potential as it recovers from the global crisis.  In mid-November, the  Managing Director of the IMF, Dominique Strauss-Kahn,  begins a six-day trip to Asia.  First he’s in Singapore attending the 16th Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Finance Ministers’ Meeting, and then goes on to China November 16-17, one of the region’s most dynamic economies. 

In Singapore, the Managing Director co-chairs a roundtable discussion on economic policy challenges facing the region and will deliver a lecture on the role of Asia in reshaping the post-crisis global economy. In China, he will discuss with the authorities their policy response to the global crisis and ask senior government officials about their outlook for the Chinese and world economies.

The visit is another sign of the importance which the IMF attaches to its relationship with  Asia as the region leads the world away from crisis toward global recovery.  It will also provide Asia and the IMF an opportunity to deepen their engagement.

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