Don’t Forget Financial Sector Reform


By John Lipsky

There is a broad consensus on at least one conclusion from the turmoil of the past few years: Fundamental changes are needed in the global financial sector.

Some of these changes seem relatively clear:

  • Risk management of many financial firms needs strengthening
  • Compensation schemes need to be re-evaluated
  • Capital standards need to be bolstered
  • Regulation needs fundamental reform
  • Supervision needs to be improved
  • And financial institutions’ balance sheets need to be freed of the burden of impaired assets.

Nonetheless, important tradeoffs will have to be addressed—and political hurdles surmounted—before significant progress can be achieved.

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Going Beyond the Rules


By José Viñals

Some countries with similar financial and regulatory systems fared differently during this crisis. What are the reasons for this? And what made some financial institutions with similar business models, and in the same country, better equipped to deal with the virulence of the crisis? To find the answers, we need to ask the following question: How well did the four key components of a sound financial system―good regulation, effective supervision, robust risk management, and credible resolution mechanisms―perform?

A lot of attention has been paid to improving regulation, the first key component. Sweeping changes are being proposed through new and enhanced rules of the game, such as higher capital, loan loss provisions, liquidity buffers, and limits on executive compensation. I believe that corresponding changes are also needed in the other three components if a crisis of this magnitude is to be avoided in the future.

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