The Priority of Growth and Jobs—the IMF’s Dialogue with the Unions


By Dominique Strauss-Kahn

I had the pleasure of addressing the 2nd World Congress of the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) in Vancouver a couple of weeks ago, and participating in a panel debate. I also met privately with some key union leaders.

For me, three main points emerged.

First, I was confirmed in my belief that, for the IMF, our interaction with the labor movement is extremely valuable. We make it a point to meet with unions, including in the context of our lending programs. Over the past few years, I have personally met international trade union leaders four times—on the eve of important G-20 meetings—as well as with individual union leaders. So the labor movement has a lot of influence on the way we work—even if they do not always think so.

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Social Costs of Recession


By Caroline Atkinson

As I noted earlier this week, the recession seems to be easing its grip. In fits and starts, recovery is likely to get under way in coming months in most major economies. That is good news—especially compared to the gloom and fear earlier this year. But the bad news is that the social cost of the crisis is set to keep rising for some time. Unemployment—the symbol of the Great Depression—will get nowhere near the levels of the 1930s. But in advanced economies, jobless rates are already much higher than they have been for a long time.

The U.S. jobless numbers announced today give some encouragement, with a sharp decline in the number of jobs lost last month and an unexpected easing in the jobless rate. But, as a lagging indicator, unemployment worldwide is still expected to go on increasing well into 2010. The International Labor Organization thinks that as many as 50 million people could lose their jobs before this is all over. Of course, in emerging and low-income countries, where social safety nets are weak or non-existent, the human cost from unemployment is even higher.

As a lagging indicator, unemployment worldwide is still expected to go on increasing well into 2010 (photo: Sergio Perez/Reuters)

As a lagging indicator, unemployment worldwide is still expected to go on increasing well into 2010 (photo: Sergio Perez/Reuters)

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