Unlocking Central Asia’s Huge Potential


By Masood Ahmed

The IMF has just finished its Annual Meetings in Istanbul, the traditional start of the old silk road and the gateway to Central Asia. 

Strategically located between East Asia and Europe, and South Asia and Russia, Central Asia is rich in resources and faces tremendous opportunities—yet to be made the most of. Since the outset of their transition to a market economy, the countries of the region have made visible progress toward decentralizing their economies, creating market institutions, expanding international links, and intensifying efforts to diversify and increase production and trade. 

As a result—and owing also to sound macroeconomic management, high commodity prices, and strong foreign inflows—this landlocked region, the size of the European Union and home to 60 million people, enjoyed near double-digit growth on average during 2001–07. 

Oil wells in Baku, Azerbaijan: With global energy demand increasing again, Central Asia's energy exporters should see growth rates increase in 2010 (photo: David Mdzinarishvili /Reuters)

Oil wells in Baku, Azerbaijan: With global energy demand increasing again, Central Asia's energy exporters should see growth rates increase in 2010 (photo: David Mdzinarishvili /Reuters)

But, as elsewhere in the world, the global economic crisis has taken a toll on Central Asia, with average growth for the region as a whole sinking from 5.7 percent in 2008 to 1.2 percent in 2009. Nevertheless, this average masks important differences across countries. 

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